From 27m ago

Evacuation due to failing dam in Echunga, South Australia

Natasha May

Natasha May

Dipping out of politics for a moment for an emergency warning in South Australia:

A dam is failing in the Adelaide Hills town of Echunga with locals evacuating under an emergency warning.

The South Australian SES (State Emergency Service) issued a Dam Failure Emergency Warning this morning, with residents told to relocate outside the warning area.

David O’Shannessy, a spokesman for the SA SES told Guardian Australia that the Echunga dam’s wall has been compromised because a combination of conditions from recent wet weather with the dam full and the ground sodden.

O’Shannessy said that there are 60 properties in the warning area, which are a combination of some homes and businesses.

The dam is 10 megalitres, which for context is about the size of 4 Olympic swimming pools.

Updated at 23.21 BST

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Dipping out of politics for a moment for an emergency warning in South Australia:

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A dam is failing in the Adelaide Hills town of Echunga with locals evacuating under an emergency warning.

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The South Australian SES (State Emergency Service) issued a Dam Failure Emergency Warning this morning, with residents told to relocate outside the warning area.

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O’Shannessy said that there are 60 properties in the warning area, which are a combination of some homes and businesses.

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The dam is 10 megalitres, which for context is about the size of 4 Olympic swimming pools.

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We’ve made it to the last day of the make-up sitting – after this, the MPs won’t be back in Canberra for a month when they’ll return for the budget.

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So it’ll be a big day with lots to get through. After all, budget week makes it hard to get clean air for anything other than the budget, so if you want a song and dance over what you’re doing, you’ve got to get in before or after.

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The prime minister is back from Japan, just in time for the government to introduce the national anti-corruption commission legislation. It’ll be the first time a major party has introduced legislation for a federal Icac (the crossbench, especially Helen Haines tried). The Morrison government “tabled” its exposure draft but never actually introduced legislation into the parliament.

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After it’s introduced, the bill will go straight to a committee for review, where the high threshold for public hearings is expected to get a workout – so far, from what’s been released, it’s the most controversial part. But we’ll find out more when it’s officially introduced – and Paul Karp will be all over that like me on cake.

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Cost of living will also dominate the parliamentary group chat (question time) with the fuel excise pause expiring at 11.59pm. Will there be queues for petrol today? Probably not. Fuel is already expensive. But from tonight it will increase by what the ACCC thinks should be, on average, by 25 cents a litre. Still, it will come as a shock for a lot of people to see petrol jump up overnight and add fuel (if you like) to the fire for the government to do something on the cost of living. We know that the government is planning a “bread and butter” budget (the opposition is repeating the line it’ll be all Australians can afford boom tish – because struggling to make ends meet is apparently pun worthy) so there won’t be a lot of planned relief. But fuel is something everyone can see going up. The excise pause was always due to expire tonight – that’s what the previous government set – and Jim Chalmers has been making the argument that to extend it will cost $6bn. It’s still going to hurt though.

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We’ll cover all the day’s events – and reactions – so thank you for joining us . You have Sarah Martin, Paul Karp and Josh Butler on deck, and Mike Bowers is off his project and back where he belongs – walking the hallways and getting into mischief for you. You’ve got Amy Remeikis on the blog for most of the day.

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Ready? It’ll be a four-coffee day, minimum, over here, so let’s get into it.

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Key events

In terms of the senate business, Matt Canavan is still all about nuclear (an energy source his government didn’t make any moves on, because of the cost, the time delay, and the changes in technologies making it increasingly obsolete – especially given how long it takes to get a reactor online)

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Today I will introduce legislation to remove the ban on nuclear energy.

With 9 Senators co-sponsoring the Bill, it is the largest Parliamentary support for removing the ban ever.

It is time to join the rest of the world and treat nuclear energy as a safe and effective option.

&mdash; Soccer Dad Matt Canavan (@mattjcan) September 27, 2022

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Today I will introduce legislation to remove the ban on nuclear energy.

With 9 Senators co-sponsoring the Bill, it is the largest Parliamentary support for removing the ban ever.

It is time to join the rest of the world and treat nuclear energy as a safe and effective option.

— Soccer Dad Matt Canavan (@mattjcan) September 27, 2022

For those who missed it yesterday, Greens senator Mehreen Faruqi has lodged a complaint with the Australian Human Rights Commission over a tweet from Pauline Hanson.

Faruqi had moved a motion to censure Hanson over the abusive tweet – the One Nation leader had said Faruqi could “piss off back to Pakistan” after Faruqi shared her feelings on the effects of British colonisation after the Queen’s death.

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Senator Hanson’s tweet instigated an avalanche of hate. This whole ordeal has been one of the hardest things I’ve ever had to deal with. It’s hard to explain the immense toll this takes on you.

&mdash; Mehreen Faruqi (@MehreenFaruqi) September 27, 2022

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Senator Hanson’s tweet instigated an avalanche of hate. This whole ordeal has been one of the hardest things I’ve ever had to deal with. It’s hard to explain the immense toll this takes on you.

— Mehreen Faruqi (@MehreenFaruqi) September 27, 2022

The senate amended the motion to remove the direct mention of Hanson and instead condemned racism as a whole.

Hanson, in her speech to the senate denied she had been racist, as she didn’t feel superior to any other race. She dared anyone to find anything racist she had said and then finished her speech by offering to take Faruqi to the airport.

Faruqi said it was beyond time to take a stand

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Racism must be identified and called out every time, and people who spew such hate must face serious consequences. That’s why I moved to censure Senator Hanson in the Senate today. pic.twitter.com/HBiJBeY11h

&mdash; Mehreen Faruqi (@MehreenFaruqi) September 27, 2022

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Racism must be identified and called out every time, and people who spew such hate must face serious consequences. That’s why I moved to censure Senator Hanson in the Senate today. pic.twitter.com/HBiJBeY11h

— Mehreen Faruqi (@MehreenFaruqi) September 27, 2022

More practices will close without government help, says Royal Australian College of GPs

The Royal Australian College of GPs is sounding a very loud alarm about the crisis impacting GPs – if you think it’s hard to get in to see a doctor now, it’s likely to get even harder. And in some areas, particularly regional Australia, impossible.

The college’s president Adj Prof Karen Price says “unless things change, more and more practices will face the impossible decision of hiking fees for patients or closing up shop”.

“Just 13.8% of future doctors are choosing general practice as their career and sourcing and retaining GPs has now become the highest priority challenge reported by practice owners in 2022,” she says.

“The disrespect and disinvestment in general practice has had predictable and shameful effects.

“Government can help secure the future of the GP workforce by immediately boosting investment in general practice care so that it is put on a more sustainable, long-term financial footing. This will help ease the pressure on vulnerable patients, their GPs, and general practice teams. Proper resourcing will help attract more future doctors to the profession and make sure all patients, including those in remote and rural areas, get the care they need when they need it.”

What would help? Lifting some of the administrative burden and doing something about the Medicare rate freeze.

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General practice is at breaking point, and something needs to be done immediately to avoid Australia running out of GPs. The @RACGP has called a General Practice Crisis Summit in Canberra on 5 October to tackle the most pressing issues affecting patient care. #RACGPSummit2022

&mdash; Royal Australian College of GPs (RACGP) President (@RACGPPresident) September 26, 2022

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General practice is at breaking point, and something needs to be done immediately to avoid Australia running out of GPs. The @RACGP has called a General Practice Crisis Summit in Canberra on 5 October to tackle the most pressing issues affecting patient care. #RACGPSummit2022

— Royal Australian College of GPs (RACGP) President (@RACGPPresident) September 26, 2022

Updated at 23.24 BST

Evacuation due to failing dam in Echunga, South Australia

Natasha May

Natasha May

Dipping out of politics for a moment for an emergency warning in South Australia:

A dam is failing in the Adelaide Hills town of Echunga with locals evacuating under an emergency warning.

The South Australian SES (State Emergency Service) issued a Dam Failure Emergency Warning this morning, with residents told to relocate outside the warning area.

David O’Shannessy, a spokesman for the SA SES told Guardian Australia that the Echunga dam’s wall has been compromised because a combination of conditions from recent wet weather with the dam full and the ground sodden.

O’Shannessy said that there are 60 properties in the warning area, which are a combination of some homes and businesses.

The dam is 10 megalitres, which for context is about the size of 4 Olympic swimming pools.

Updated at 23.21 BST

Optus data breach replacement documents

Back on the Optus data breach, most of the states are coming to the party and allowing people who have been identified as part of the data breach to get a new licence (and number) without having to wait until they are a victim of fraud.

In NSW you can get a new digital licence pretty much immediately, and a card will follow.

Victoria and Queensland are also allowing the change, as is South Australia.

Western Australia is a little more complicated – you get a licence number for life there, so there isn’t an easy solution as yet. And the ACT hasn’t shifted as yet – you have to prove identity fraud before you can get a new card.

So what about passports? Well that’s a work in progress. It looks like something will be moving there very soon, but the sticking point is the cost, with a push for Optus to pay.

Updated at 23.10 BST

Passage is not assured

The main sticking point in the integrity commission legislation (which we haven’t seen as yet) is the threshold for public hearings.

The Coalition seem happy where that threshold has landed, which gives the government an option to pass it in the Senate without the Greens and the cross bench.

But the Coalition hasn’t committed to passing it. Which means at the moment it is wide open. Plus, there is still the committee review to come, which could change things again.

So at the moment, everyone is still a player.

Updated at 23.10 BST

Greens have concerns about anti-corruption public hearings

Over on ABC radio RN, Greens senator David Shoebridge says the Greens have been in good faith negotiations with the government, but they have concerns with the threshold for public hearings.

We had the previous Morison government wanting it all to be in secret, the initial discussions and communication we’d had with the Labour government was that that they weren’t going to go anywhere near that, they were going to adopt a much more discretionary test. But in the last 24 hours, we’ve seen … the Labor government go back towards something much closer to Morrison’s model and that is that is not good for fighting corruption.

One of the best ways of fighting corruption is openness … sunlight is a great disinfectant when it comes to public corruption.

Updated at 23.12 BST

Sally McManus at press club

Sally McManus will be at the press club today. The union leader has been pushing very hard for wage growth, which has been invigorated by the jobs summit, so expect her to go hard on that.

Updated at 22.54 BST

Good morning

We’ve made it to the last day of the make-up sitting – after this, the MPs won’t be back in Canberra for a month when they’ll return for the budget.

So it’ll be a big day with lots to get through. After all, budget week makes it hard to get clean air for anything other than the budget, so if you want a song and dance over what you’re doing, you’ve got to get in before or after.

The prime minister is back from Japan, just in time for the government to introduce the national anti-corruption commission legislation. It’ll be the first time a major party has introduced legislation for a federal Icac (the crossbench, especially Helen Haines tried). The Morrison government “tabled” its exposure draft but never actually introduced legislation into the parliament.

After it’s introduced, the bill will go straight to a committee for review, where the high threshold for public hearings is expected to get a workout – so far, from what’s been released, it’s the most controversial part. But we’ll find out more when it’s officially introduced – and Paul Karp will be all over that like me on cake.

Cost of living will also dominate the parliamentary group chat (question time) with the fuel excise pause expiring at 11.59pm. Will there be queues for petrol today? Probably not. Fuel is already expensive. But from tonight it will increase by what the ACCC thinks should be, on average, by 25 cents a litre. Still, it will come as a shock for a lot of people to see petrol jump up overnight and add fuel (if you like) to the fire for the government to do something on the cost of living. We know that the government is planning a “bread and butter” budget (the opposition is repeating the line it’ll be all Australians can afford boom tish – because struggling to make ends meet is apparently pun worthy) so there won’t be a lot of planned relief. But fuel is something everyone can see going up. The excise pause was always due to expire tonight – that’s what the previous government set – and Jim Chalmers has been making the argument that to extend it will cost $6bn. It’s still going to hurt though.

We’ll cover all the day’s events – and reactions – so thank you for joining us . You have Sarah Martin, Paul Karp and Josh Butler on deck, and Mike Bowers is off his project and back where he belongs – walking the hallways and getting into mischief for you. You’ve got Amy Remeikis on the blog for most of the day.

Ready? It’ll be a four-coffee day, minimum, over here, so let’s get into it.

Updated at 22.56 BST

Source: The Guardian